7 Keys to Increasing Your Church’s Footprint

Last week we defined the “footprint” of a church as the collective impact for Christ of the people within it. The number of members, budget or square footage don’t necessarily determine how wide or deep a church’s reach extends for the Kingdom. Jesus modeled discipleship and community engagement as an example for His Church to follow. He felt a small number of highly effective disciples would cover much more ground than a slew of casual followers. A larger church…

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Let Love Rule: It Might Be Time for a Heart Check

by Phil Miglioratti   Whenever a particular colleague would call me on the phone, I would immediately freeze up. Our ministry was suffering from his seemingly self-serving decision-making and destructive actions. When confronted, he refused to repent or resign. Somehow I survived that situation. But when he called, more than a decade after he finally moved on, I hesitated to pick up the phone. But I’m glad I did. This time he was calling to confess that he was…

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More Big Churches, yet a Smaller Overall Footprint

The collective footprint of the Church (capital C) in America is shrinking in terms of: Growth Impact Influence Perception We have more huge churches than ever before. Church planting organizations are launching new churches as quickly as they can. Yet the “pie” isn’t increasing in size. The percentage of Americans regularly attending and joining churches is in decline. Mainline denominations are seeing record numbers of church closures and pastors walking away from the pulpit. There are enough “Dones” (with…

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Why Bigger Is Not Necessarily Better

For companies, the objective is always growth – in size and profitability.  However, as most of us have experienced, corporate growth can actually reduce the quality of products and customer service.  New growth initiatives, whether organic or through acquisition, may excite leadership and shareholders, but usually make customers nervous. More revenues and customers are appropriate Key Performance Indicators for a business, but not for a church.  Yet nearly all churches closely track “nickels and noses”.  Does ambition for either…

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Why Many Churches Do The Unthinkable

The Good Samaritan story begins with a question by an expert in religious law – likely a leader in a church – about the first and greatest commandment.  In response to his follow-up question, Jesus defines the man’s “neighbor” not as someone who goes to his church, but a random stranger.  The first person to pass by the beaten robbery victim was a pastor, presumably hastening off to take care of his responsibilities at the church.  The second person…

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